Mathilde Roadblock and a pressie

Alternate title: Damn you, .pdf. patterns!

When I printed my Mathilde pattern, the test square measured only 95% of what it should have.  I did some crazy maths on the measurements, which led me to believe I should cut a size larger than normal, and it would probably be alright.  This, because a 5% size difference is not much of a size difference at all.

In the stolen moments between work and my busy life, I’ve managed to get most of the construction finished.  Before finishing the neckline or the hem, I tried the top on to check the fit.  And wouldn’t you know it… that missing 5% is big enough to matter.

The armholes are too tight, and there’s pulling across the shoulder and the bust.  The bust dart is way too high (although I think that’s more than 5% too high, so I’ll watch out for it if I make this pattern again).  Now I need to unpick, and unpick some more.  I think my best option is to cut a new, slightly larger and definitely longer yoke, to let out the tucks just a little bit, and to do a minor alteration on the armscye.  I am not a fan of this option, because I have never messed with an armscye, and because I currently have enough left over fabric for another little sleeveless top.  If I cut the new yoke, I risk using too much of my remaining fabric.  Another possibility is to narrow the seam allowances, but I think that’s going to be a lot of work for a very dismal result.  I’ve done french seams and all of the associated trimming, so I will get no more than an additional one or two eighths of an inch out of this method, and I’ll need to zigzag everything.  I hate a zigzagged seam finish.  Plus, it won’t do anything for that annoyingly high bust dart.

In other news, and to give you something pleasant to look at, look at this!Image

This is a magazine that my colleague surprised me with.  One afternoon, he plopped two 1941 issues of Stitch Craft onto my desk, and I let out a yelp of excitement, even though I work in a library.  Yelps of excitement are not welcome in libraries, but I just couldn’t help myself.  He’d bought two – one for himself, to check out the wartime-era advertisements, and one for me, just because.

Image

There’s a lot more than wartime-era ads in this mag!

The most exciting thing about this magazine is that it contains iron-on transfers which, from the looks of it, have never been used.  What gorgeous kitchen accessories I could make!

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2 thoughts on “Mathilde Roadblock and a pressie

  1. Is it possible you printed the pattern with page scaling on – there is a drop down where you change it from ‘fit to printable area’ to ‘none’ – I had this wrong when I first downloaded Sorbetto and only noticed when I measured the test page box (thankfully before I stuck all the pages together…)

    • You know, I thought of that, too. It wasn’t that. Just some mystery 5% shrinkage. It turned out alright in the end, although if I do make another Mathilde, I will certainly re-print the pattern to avoid the same headache.

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